Monthly Archives: April 2019

The eggs-traordinary life of Scrambles the chicken: Photos

Posted on 16/04/2019 by

The eggs-traordinary life of Scrambles the chicken: Photos Life started out in the usual way.
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Life started out in the usual way.

But it wasn’t long until life stomped me down – literally (Look closely, that’s me with the beak.)

Then Mum rescued me and life was a bed of roses….sort of.

And I met my best pal, Wuzi.

And I pretty much ruled the roost.

There were parties.

Happy birthday Nan!

Trips to the beach.

Even a visit to the snow.

I got my first pad.

And I laid my first egg!

Of course I had to take control of the remote – none of those sick cooking shows – how can you DO that to an egg?

Enough to leave you plum tuckered out.

But it hasn’t been all corn and skittles. We all have bad hair days.

And this was just ridiculous.

Christmas was a bit of a worry.

And then there was that brush with the law.

Oh the shame!

No, I’m not coming out.

But it’s all good. I’ve gone straight now and have a real job – laying the eggs for a 4.5 star hotel. I won’t be ruffling any more feathers but I won’t be going cheep either!

TweetFacebookScrambles had a tough start to life, squashed flat on the nest floor. Butshe’s a plucky little chicken and she’s had an incredible life.Follow the adventures of Scrambles by clicking or swiping through above.

Every kid needs a slide.

Smashing out a text on the iphone.

Source: Bay Post

Wesley’s sheepish return home

Posted on 16/04/2019 by

Pet sheep Wesley is welcomed home by Gerogery’s Jessica and Alamdar Dastani and his mate Brutus. Picture: PETER MERKESTEYNWESLEY the sheep has been returned to a Gerogery couple after he was stolen last month but his mate the peacock is still missing.
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Alamdar and Jessica Dastani found the sheep dumped on the side of the road covered in blood and dirt near their property on Monday.

They knew it was their animal when Wesley responded when called by name.

“He’s extremely obedient and follows you better than a dog,” Mr Dastani said.

The sheep was also missing patches of wool.

“It was horrible seeing him like that but we are really happy to have him back,” Mr Dastani said.

The sheep and peacock were taken together but Mr Dastani said they still had no leads on the bird’s whereabouts.

“I think whoever stole it must be targeting peacocks,” he said.

Mr Dastani was worried the peacock would never return.

“If it is locked up for about two months it gets used to the place and when it is released it will never leave,” he said.

“Whoever has dropped the sheep off, hopefully they will do the same with the peacock.”

Mr Dastani urged people to raise the alarm if they noticed anybody with a peacock.

“Coming into spring they are quite noisy,” he said.

Source: Border Mail

Commonwealth Games: Shelley Watts strikes goldPHOTOS

Posted on 16/04/2019 by

Commonwealth Games: Shelley Watts strikes gold | PHOTOS Golden girl: Shelley Watts. Pic: Getty Images
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old medalist Shelley Watts (2ndL) of Australia poses with silver Laishram Devi (L) of India and bronze medalists Alanna Audley-Murphy of Northern Ireland and Maria Machongua of Mozambique during the medal ceremony for the Women’s Light (57 – 60kg). Pic: Getty Images

Golden girl: Shelley Watts. Pic: Getty Images

Golden girl: Shelley Watts. Pic: Getty Images

Golden girl: Shelley Watts. Pic: Getty Images

Golden girl: Shelley Watts. Pic: Getty Images

Shelley Watts of Australia celebrates winning the gold medal against Laishram Devi of India. Pic: Getty Images

The gold medal bout – Shelley Watts against Laishram Devi of India. Pic: Getty Images

Shelley Watts of Australia celebrates winning the gold medal against Laishram Devi of India. Pic: Getty Images

Shelley Watts of Australia celebrates winning the gold medal against Laishram Devi of India. Pic: Getty Images

The gold medal bout – Shelley Watts against Laishram Devi of India. Pic: Getty Images

The gold medal bout – Shelley Watts against Laishram Devi of India. Pic: Getty Images

Shelley Watts of Australia celebrates winning the gold medal against Laishram Devi of India. Pic: Getty Images

TweetFacebookMORE READING, MORE PHOTOSPhotos:Shelley Watts makes the gold medal boutThe latest:Day 10 – how it happened for the AussiesPhotos:From the trackThere have been Australian female boxers of note, but there will never be another first Australian female gold medallist. That is Shelley Watts.

Nor has there been any Australian with the substantial career Watts now has ahead of her, with world championships and an Olympic Games on her agenda. Having taken up the sport in 2010, just as it was made legal and professional in Australia, the 26-year-old criminal law student has dominated the lightweight division in Glasgow, although her final, against India’s Laishram Devi, was rugged enough for Watts to describe it as a ‘war’.

Watts’s style may best be described in contrast to the bout before hers. In the women’s flyweight final, England’s Nicola Adams’s spunk and bluff took her a fair way towards a contentious split decision over Northern Ireland’s Michaela Walsh. ‘I was cheated,’ Walsh later tweeted.

Adams, the sport’s inaugural Olympic gold medallist at London in 2012 and a world number one with an iconic career already behind her, inhabits that celebrated crossover space between ringcraft and stagecraft. But if Adams has something of the Apollo Creed of women’s boxing about her, Shelley Watts is the Shelley Watts and none other.

There is little adornment or salesmanship; her boxing is nuggety and streamlined, as she bunches herself into a ball of efficiency that is ever on the advance. Her balance and speed suggest that she would be good at any number of sports, which indeed she was until a knee reconstruction curtailed her soccer and touch football days and sent her into a Lismore boxing gym four years ago.

There is plenty of personality in Watts’s boxing, but it’s not for show. Only after winning does she let loose her genuine happiness and kiss the camera. In the first round of her gold medal bout against Devi, she was consistently beaten to the punch.

She regrouped with coach Don Abnett and stuck to her plan, which was to wear Devi out with high-intensity combat. “The coaches knew she was going to tire eventually,” Watts said. “The fast pace was going to take its toll, and I knew I would have plenty in the tank.”

The second and third rounds were frenetic, Watts engaging the taller and more experienced Devi with rapid-fire exchanges and landing some heavy blows with her right hand. Her hair came loose from its moorings and her ponytail flew as her straight right kept pummelling Devi.

By the fourth, both fighters were clearly tired, though Watts said she still had energy to spare. By that stage she didn’t need it, as Devi was spent. “It was a great fight, it was a war,” Watts said. “Not a lot of tactics, just a lot of punches thrown, but sometimes you’ve just got to brawl it.”

Her wonderful tournament at an end, Watts was looking forward to having a plate of ribs and then getting home to reunite with her friends in Australia and her family on New South Wales’ north coast. For some, the sight of women boxing is as unseemly as women’s swimming appeared a hundred years ago in Kellerman’s time and women’s surfing fifty years ago in O’Donnell’s. Times change in big historic moments, and one has Shelley Watts’s kisser all over it.

[email protected] wins our 1st ever #CommwealthGames women’s boxing medal.. & it’s GOLD! Hope you can make another 1st at #Rio2016#RoadtoRio

— AUS Olympic Team (@AUSOlympicTeam) August 2, 2014This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Matthew Mitcham rethinks retirement plans and eyes Rio Olympic Games

Posted on 16/04/2019 by

In the end, the 10 metre platform showdown between Matthew Mitcham and Tom Daley was all a bit of a no-contest. It was, as Mitcham had actually predicted himself: Daley was on form and looked a class above the rest of the field, while Mitcham performance was off and the challenge of the 2008 Olympic champion quickly faded as he finished almost 100 points behind the England superstar.
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However, despite the disappointing result Mitcham, who had come into the Commonwealth Games believing he would most likely retire after the competition, has been encouraged enough by his overall performances, to continue his career to the 2016 Olympics, possibly specialising in synchronised events. Mitcham and Domonic Bedggood won the synchronised 10 metre platform gold medal on Friday night, while he won the silver with Grant Nel in the synchronised three metre springboard.

“I was pretty convinced that this was going to be the end of it for me but after how well Dom and I did in synchro, my coach Chava (Sobrino) was like ‘don’t be too hasty with this, maybe we can work something out with Diving Australia’.

“(There) may be the possibility of being a synchro specialist just to reduce my load because my body can’t take the load that I’ve been putting it through for the last 11 years or so and also I  guess to give me more time to my career outside of sport.”

Daley, the London Olympic bronze medallist was superb on Saturday night accumulating 516 points, which included dives of 94.50, 93.50 and 102.60. He did have a shaky second dive where he scored 64.80,  but even then Malaysia’s Ooi Tze Liang, the three metre springboard champion, was the nearest competitor with 433.70 points. Canada’s Vincent Riendeau (429.25) won the bronze. Mitcham was out of the contest after his first two dives when he was ranked ninth in the 11-diver field.

“He (Daley) was just diving out of his skin and that was the type of quality that I’m more used to seeing from him,” Mitcham said. “The fact that he’s still got that one weak dive but can still score over 500 points is a real testament to how well he’s diving and if he fixed up that one dive he’s got the potential to be the best in the world.”

Mitcham, who has struggled with a series of injuries since 2010, said while he performed below par, he could not be disappointed his overall results, having won a gold medal and two silvers.

“It was really just not a good competition for me … but if I don’t really feel like wallowing in my own pity for very long I just look into my training bag and go ‘look at all that hardware’,” Mitcham said.

“I’ve achieved everything that I really wanted to achieve from this Commonwealth Games and then some so I’m really, really happy.”

Mitcham, who will be performing a cabaret show at festivals in Darwin and Adelaide in coming months, said he was keen to concentrate on his post-diving career.

“I’ve got lots of stuff and I can’t keep putting my life on hold so Chava and I and Diving Australia are going to have a chat and see how we can make this work,” he said.

“I don’t know if it’s going to happen, if it’s going to work but it really would be a shame to let such a great partnership go to waste only two years out from Rio.”

“I totally want a career in the entertainment industry, not just stage but television and radio, so if I can develop that career ideally I would love to develop it simultaneously while doing a bit more diving.

“But if I’ve got a wonderful job opportunity that’s going to take the priority.”

Sobrino, who is also an Australian team coach, said it was important to keep Mitcham in the sport because his partnership with Bedggood in the synchronised 10 metre platform would be a “really good chance for a medal in Rio”.

“With all his problems and all that he’s been a difficult one and then suddenly a few months ago things started getting a little bit better, he hasn’t reached his potential again but he’s started enjoying the sport,” Sobrino said.

“Looking at the prospects of Rio and looking at him and the way he’s progressed in the last month it would be a good idea just to hold it (retirement) back. I want him to have a long break and (let his elbow) get better and keep training hard in the gym away from the pool and think about it.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Melbourne shivers through coldest morning of year

Posted on 16/04/2019 by

Melbourne has recorded its coldest morning in 16 years.
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The Bureau of Meteorology recorded a chilly 2.4 degrees at 6am before the mercury plummeted further to 1.4 at 7.33am.

Senior forecaster Richard Carlyon said the last time Melbourne was this cold was in June 1998, which also recorded a low of 1.4 degrees.

But despite the frosty start to Sunday, the overnight temperature had not set any records, he said.

Mr Carlyon said the coldest temperatures recorded in Melbourne were set in the 1800s, when the city was “surrounded by paddocks and had no buildings to trap the heat in”.

The lowest overnight temperature in Melbourne’s history was recorded on July 21, 1869, where the mercury dropped to a freezing -2.8 degrees.

“We haven’t seen a negative in Melbourne city since 1984, which was the last sub-zero morning in Melbourne,” he said.

Temperatures at Essendon Airport plummeted to -1.7 this morning, and Viewbank residents shivered through 1.2 degrees.

State-wide, Ballarat hovered at -4.6 about 2.40am, and Bendigo recorded -4 overnight.

The coldest areas in Victoria were Omeo in the state’s north-east, which saw the mercury plummet to -7.6, and Mount Hotham, where the lowest temperature was -8.7.

Despite the well-below-freezing conditions, no snow fell overnight, Mr Carlyon said.

“These were good snow-making conditions in the Alps, but because we had no rainfall, there was no precipitation,” he said.

The frosty start continues this weekend’s wintry chill, which has seen hail in the city and substantial snowfall elsewhere.

Temperatures on Friday night hovered around five degrees after what was recorded as the coldest August day in almost six years, with the most widespread snowfall in over 25 years.

Mr Carlyon said Melburnians will face another cold morning on Monday.

“We will probably have another cold morning tomorrow, where light winds and clear skies will bring similar temperatures to this morning,” he said.

He said it was not unusual to get frost at this time of the year, and the bureau had released a frost warning for the state on Monday.

Sunday’s early chill in Melbourne will be followed by a predicted sunny day with a maximum of 14 degrees.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.