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New cameras to target Ballarat motorists

Posted on 24/04/2020 by

New speed camera are expected to be rolled out across the state. LEADFOOTEDBallarat motorists could be targeted by new hi-tech speed cameras set to be introduced as part of a statewide rollout.
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The city’s three mobile speed cameras could be in line to receive an upgrade after the state government announced $17.1 million upgrade to 131 mobile speed cameras across Victoria.

The tender released this week will seehi-tech cameras introduced over the next four years andwill be able to photograph speeding motorists night and day from the front and back, and across eight lanes of traffic.

“It’s about replacing 131 cameras that are 23 years old. So we’re looking for world’s best technology to make sure that Victoria has the safest roads in the world,” Police Minister Kim Wells said.

Victoria’s existing speed cameras gather the Victorian government around $100 million a year in revenue but have limited night-time use and cannot photograph all speeding motorcyclists because motorcycles do not have front-facing registration plates.

“Technology in this area is advancing rapidly and we will explore all options to make Victoria’sroad safety camera network as strong as it can be,” Mr Wells said.

“We will be looking at everything the market has to offer, including the potential to capturefront and rear licence plates and speeding vehicles across multiple lanes.

“We know the majority of motorists do the right thing and comply with the speed limit. Thelatest advances in technology can assist us in catching those who don’t.”

Victoria currently has a widerangingroad safety camera network including fixed,mobile and point-to-point cameras for detecting speed, unregistered drivers and motorists who run red lights.

Mr Wells said expanding Victoria’s speed camera system was a key part of Victoria’s 10-yearRoad Safety Strategy which helps to ensure that Victorian roads are safe for all road users.

Details of the road safety camera system can be found at the Cameras Save Lives website.

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Your Stars 4.8.14

Posted on 24/04/2020 by

ARIES: Those Arians who are not in touch with their inner souls may experience unsettling episodes that will force them to look inwards. Family matters will be the source of such a disturbance.
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TAURUS: Your communications are heavily coloured by emotions during August 4, 5, influencing your interaction with those closest to you. This has the potential to create some problems.

GEMINI: It seems like you are investing a lot of effort for very little return during August 4, 5. Consequently, it doesn’t take much for someone to push the wrong buttons.

CANCER: You are so deeply involved with love issues during August 4, 5 that you will only see what you want to see. This applies to romantic relationships or to one of your children.

LEO: Emotional discontent will swell within the home during August 4, 5. This situation will be difficult to manage because it is hard to understand the cause.

VIRGO: During August 4, 5 social considerations and friends will easily influence your thoughts and plans: this is not necessarily good for you. Take time to do what is right for you.

LIBRA: A strong emphasis on money matters exists during August 4, 5, and it is likely that you will have trouble controlling a compulsion to spend. However, there are good trends for earning it too.

SCORPIO: August 4, 5 is a time when you will be able to use your Scorpion talents skilfully, wreaking havoc if you desire or making life more pleasant. The choice is yours.

SAGITTARIUS: August 4, 5 are not the best days for Sagittarius. It is extremely hard to be objective about the problems you face then and you will likely not see the forest for the trees.

CAPRICORN: You will surely know how to enjoy life during August 4, 5, as you embrace it with an earthy passion. Having your partner at your side makes the experience all the more enjoyable.

AQUARIUS: It is easier than usual to see where you want to go with your life during August 4, 5. This is a good time to make minor adjustments to your course.

PISCES: Pisceans will be wearing their blinkers during August 4, 5, although it doesn’t seem to do you a lot of harm. The intensity of your desires drives you towards the realisation of your dreams.

LUCKY NUMBERS: Aries: 1, 3, 4, 9; Taurus: 5, 8; Gemini: 6, 7; Cancer: 3, 4, 7, 9; Leo: 1, 3, 4, 9; Virgo: 6, 8; Libra: 5, 7; Scorpio: 2, 3, 7, 9; Sagittarius: 1, 3, 4, 9; Capricorn: 5, 6; Aquarius: 5, 6; Pisces: 2, 4, 7.

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Dramatic, cut-throat, exciting and emotional: Hockeyroos gold-medal match was sport at its best

Posted on 24/04/2020 by

The moment it became real – the Hockeyroos celebrate their Commonwealth gold medal win against England. Photo: Paul Gilham, Getty Images Sport.Whatever is said – or not said – about the Commonwealth Games, it is hard to imagine any sporting contest finishing with the drama and excitement of the women’s gold-medal hockey match between Australia and England. Sport is easy to love when it produces stories like this.
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At stake: Australia, a young team stepping out the shadow of golden eras past, and taking a step in building their own legacy. They had beaten England 3-0 earlier in the week and bristled with confidence. England, also a young group hungry to make its name as a dark horse, having upset New Zealand in the semi-final and aiming to sneak up on Australia this night.

Commonwealth Games 2014: hockey, day 10 | PHOTOS

A filthy night it was too, with rain and wind sweeping the Glasgow National Hockey Centre. The weather eased before the start of the match, but left a film of water on the field, making the ball sticky and slow on the ground but skiddy when airborne and bouncing.

The challenge of pressure plus conditions seemed to affect Australia more, initially at least. England came out fresh and perky, while the Australians appeared tentative. Only a left-footed stop by goalkeeper Rachael Finch in the sixth minute stopped England from taking a cheeky lead.

Nearly falling behind galvanised the Australians, and their experienced players took charge. Their twin towers in defence, Jodie Kenny and Anna Flanagan, were calm and impassable in setting the tempo of the game, while captain Madonna Blyth patrolled the middle of the field suspiciously, stooped and quick-witted and beady-eyed. As Australia exerted control, England fell back into a defensive pattern, hoping to frustrate the Hockeyroos and create chances on the break.

As the first half deepened, two themes emerged. The first was that Australia were more likely to score – Kellie White scooping the ball wide from point-blank range in the 15th minute was the best hope, and then Australia missed from a penalty corner a minute before half-time. England, meanwhile, sat back and entrenched themselves. But the second theme was the scoreboard. The longer it remained a 0-0 game, the more Australia’s patience would be tested and the more encouragement England would take. Australia were strung between two opposites: overconfidence, because they were controlling the game, and anxiety, because they were not scoring.

In the 13th minute of the second half, that tension broke England’s way. Kenny made a rare foray upfield, but England won the ball. As the Australian defence was reorganising, a moment’s confusion in the circle gave England’s Lily Owsley an opportunity which she took with a clever flick into the roof of the net.

The scoreboard pressure of 0-0 had taken a toll on the Australians. Now 0-1 produced signs of panic and sloppiness from a team that had been imperious all tournament. Worse, it was one of those matches in which the scoring opportunities were rare. Ashleigh Nelson and Brooke Peris were both blocked on the same play with eight minutes to go. Soon the clock seemed to speed up as the home crowd, sensing an underdog victory, lifted and chanted for England.

For so long, it looked like a giant-killer’s tale. Australia looked like a team that would beat England most times they played, but this was the one night when the pluck and spirit of the lesser team would win through. And up to the last minute, England would have deserved a win. In the 21 minutes of play since going ahead on the scoreboard, England were the better team.

But there was still a minute to go. Australia pressed down the right through the ever-dangerous Georgie Parker, and won a penalty corner. By the time Casey Eastham took it, 30 seconds remained. The ball went to Kenny, but England blocked her shot, surely to claim the win. But no – the umpire saw England’s defenders break too quickly, and re-awarded Australia the corner.

Now England protested, calling for a video referral. Australia’s coaching staff called out from the sideline, correctly, that referrals were not allowed when the ruling was a break. But England’s protest was against Eastham’s manner of taking the corner, suggesting that she had feinted, causing the defenders to run out too soon.

Eventually the appeal was rejected. Eastham was to take the corner again, with 24 seconds on the clock. The umpire warned her to stroke the ball in a regular fashion. She sent it out again, not this time to Kenny but to Flanagan. Her shot was blocked by goalkeeper Maddie Hinch, and again, for a moment, England thought they had won. But the ball rebounded to Kenny, owner of the most feared stick on the field; she slotted the ball into the right-hand side of the net.

From the brink of shock and despair, Australia had saved the match, in the last seconds, with the last play. From the brink of elation, England had been pulled back. Now for the cruellest cut, the penalty shootout. Either Hinch or Lynch was destined to be the grinch. Hockey’s adjustment to a one-on-one mobile contest between shooter and goalkeeper, rather than penalty strokes, as the tie-breaker is a welcome one. As Lynch said later, ‘I enjoy it more than just standing there and hoping I might get something on it, because it lets me show what I can do.’

Eastham went first, for Australia, weaving left and sliding the ball under Hinch. Georgie Trigg replied successfully for England, going wide and right around Lynch.

Then Australia lost the advantage of going first. Kellie White put on a tricky play and eluded Hinch, but slightly mishit her shot, giving the goalkeeper that split-second to stop it.

England had their best attacking player, Alex Danson, up next. Surely she would score. She didn’t. Lynch forced her wide to the right and her shot missed.

Next, Parker for Australia: sure, fast and into the left-hand corner.

England had scored their last goal. Lynch came out hard at Susie Gilbert, and saved well.

So it was set up for Kenny, the blonde lynchpin of Australia’s defence and a constant goalscoring threat. No more fitting end could come.

For once, Kenny didn’t do it. She took the ball to the advancing Hinch and veered right. As Kenny swung her stick at the ball, Hinch slid in and brought her down. The ball went wide – advantage England. But the umpire called a foul, which meant a penalty stroke for Kenny. Advantage Australia! England asked for another video referral. Advantage England? The decision was upheld: Hinch had touched the ball fractionally after she had impeded Kenny.

So Kenny took the penalty stroke. Now she would finish it.

Kenny missed, left.

It was back to evens. Now Nicola White came up for England. Lynch came out at her again to narrow the angle. White rounded her and beat her to the right. Just as White was steadying to tuck the ball in on a sharpish angle, it ran away from her and escaped over the line. Incredible.

If there was any player Australia would have wanted to see now, it was their captain. Blyth, their best penalty artist, their best player, had been saved for this moment. She looked supremely calm and mentally ordered. ‘I’m glad I looked that way!’ she joked later. She took the ball forward, not at great speed, but with intent. It happened fast and slow at the same time. She feinted just enough to send Hinch off balance, and tucked the ball to the left, and in, a textbook execution.

That is it, in all its detail. A great sporting event, and the second time in successive Commonwealth Games that Australia has won a gold medal in this cut-throat manner, though in Delhi, against New Zealand, it was in the old penalty stroke format. Nearly all of England’s players were in tears. They had come excruciatingly close three, four, five times, and it had been taken away from them. Cruel. Some of the Australians were in tears, too. Their coach, Adam Commens, said that if they had lost he would still have been proud of the positive way they had played and developed their style in this tournament. Process over result. But still, he was glad of the result. Lynch was quietly pleased. She had shown what she could do, just like she said she would. Blyth was as composed in victory as she had been at every point of the match. She would have been the only person in the place who was. But only on the outside, and that’s the trick of it.

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Bikie charged over bouncer gun threat

Posted on 24/04/2020 by

A bikie has allegedly threatened a bouncer with a gun after being denied entry to a club in Melbourne’s inner south.
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Victoria Police spokesman Sergeant Kris Hamilton said four men and a woman linked to the Mongols Outlaw Motorcycle Gang were outside a Fitzroy Street bar in St Kilda when a man allegedly produced a firearm and threatened security at about 12.45am on Sunday.

Although the group was allowed entry, police were called soon after.

When police arrived the gang members fled east down Fitzroy Street before officers found them in a nearby car park. Two knives and a gun were also found, Sergeant Hamilton said.

A 28-year-old Brighton East man, a 29-year-old Heatherton man, a 40-year-old man from Altona Meadows, a 27-year-old Brighton East man and a 29-year-old Langwarrin woman were arrested at the scene.

After being interviewed at the St Kilda police station, all but the Brighton East man were released, pending further investigation.

The 27-year-old Brighton East man was charged with being a prohibited person possessing a firearm. He is expected to face the Melbourne Magistrates Court later on Sunday.

Assistant Commissioner Stephen Fontana said outlaw motorcycle gangs such as the Mongols posed a “significant threat to the community”.

“Over the last 12 months, we’ve probably charged close to 300 members of outlaw motorcycle gangs for 1200 serious offences,” Assistant Commissioner Fontana said.

Referring to the St Kilda incident, the assistant commissioner said the Mongols – who re-branded from the Finks – were trying to increase their base in Victoria, and to “patch over to this international gang”.

“They hunt in packs, and this is just another example of cowardly use of force with weapons … where they’re trying to intimidate and stand over people,” he said.

“We’d ask people who have any information about their criminal activities to please contact Crime Stoppers.”

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Temora midfielder Sam Fisher to make miraculous return

Posted on 24/04/2020 by

Temora midfielder Sam Fisher.
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Farrer League

TEMORA midfielder Sam Fisher is expected to make a miraculous return from injury to line-up in first grade when the Kangaroos take on North Wagga this week.

Fisher told The Daily Advertiser a week ago he would be “lucky to play again this year” as he planned to undergo surgery on a damaged ligament in his foot.

Scans had revealed the ligament had been torn away from the bone, after Temora earlier suspected a broken bone.

On Saturday, Fisher made a shock return to play reserve grade and Kangaroos coach Mark Kruger yesterday flagged a return to first grade this week.

“Sam got through three quarters and played really well,” Kruger said.

“I’d say myself, Jack Irvine and Sam will be three definite ins next week.”

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Commonwealth Games 2014: athletics, day 10PHOTOS

Posted on 24/04/2020 by

Commonwealth Games 2014: athletics, day 10 | PHOTOS Alana Boyd of Australia celebrates as she wins gold in the Women’s Pole Vault final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images
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Alana Boyd of Australia competes in the Women’s Pole Vault final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Alana Boyd of Australia celebrates in the Women’s Pole Vault final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Alana Boyd of Australia celebrates as she wins gold in the Women’s Pole Vault final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Hamish Peacock of Australia celebrates winning bronze in the Men’s Javelin final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Bronze medalist Hamish Peacock of Australia congratulates gold medalist Julius Kiplangat Yego of Kenya after the Men’s Javelin final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Silver medalist Keshorn Walcott of Trinidad and Tobago, gold medalist Julius Kiplangat Yego of Kenya and bronze medalist Hamish Peacock of Australia pose on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Men’s Javelin Throw. Photo: Getty Images

Bronze medalist Hamish Peacock of Australia on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Men’s Javelin Throw at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Conrad Williams, Matthew Hudson-Smith, Michael Bingham and Daniel Awde of England pose with the Bronze medalists Women’s 4×400 metres team, Shana Cox, Kelly Massey, Christine Ohuruogu and Anyika Onuora of England after the Men’s 4×400 metres relay at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Usain Bolt, Nickel Ashmeade Kemar Bailey-Cole and Jason Livermore of Jamaica pose on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Men’s 4×100 metres relay. Photo: Getty Images

Luke Cann of Australia competes in the Men’s Javelin final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Josh Robinson of Australia competes in the Men’s Javelin final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Stuart Farquhar of New Zealand competes in the Men’s Javelin final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Usain Bolt of Jamaica runs the anchor leg in the mens 4x100m relay during day 10 of the 20th Commonwealth Games at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Usain Bolt of Jamaica runs the anchor leg in the mens 4x100m relay during day 10 of the 20th Commonwealth Games at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Helen Clitheroe of England, Jo Pavey of England, Janet Kisa of Kenya and Emelia Gorecka of England compete in the Women’s 5000 metres final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Gold medalist James Kiplagat Magut of Kenya, Elijah Motonei Manangoi of Kenya and silver medalist Ronald Kwemoi of Kenya celebrate after the Men’s 1500 metres final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Caitlin Sargent of Australia competes in Women’s 4×400 metres relay final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

James Kiplagat Magut of Kenya and Ronald Kwemoi of Kenya compete in the Men’s 1500 metres final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Alana Boyd of Australia slips in the Women’s Pole Vault final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Athletes compete in the Women’s 5000 metres final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Liz Parnov of Australia shows her emotions in the Women’s Pole Vault final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

Liz Parnov of Australia competes in the Women’s Pole Vault final at Hampden Park. Photo: Getty Images

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UPDATED: Snow fun: pictures, photos

Posted on 24/04/2020 by

UPDATED: Snow fun: pictures, photos Young Alby enjoying the snow at Waratah. Picture: Anna Davis.
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Near Devils Gullet. Picture: Mandy Wyatt.

Leah, 2, in the snow. Picture: Tamara Mawer.

Wombat at the Visitor Centre at Cradle Mountain. Picture: Alison Gibson.

Rainbow over Waratah. Picture: Jeff Crowe.

Shayden having fun. Picture: Seona Powell.

Waratah. Picture: Van De Belt Esther.

Guilford near Waratah. Picture: David Bosworth.

Waratah. Picture: Van De Belt Esther.

Waratah. Picture: Karl Rahn.

Waratah. Picture: Karl Rahn.

Waratah. Picture: Karl Rahn.

Snow over the railway lines. Picture: Seona Powell.

Wombat at Cradle Mountain. Picture: Samantha Ralston.

Cradle Mountain. Picture: Brittany Atkins.

Cradle Mountain. Picture: Brittany Atkins.

Picture: Tan Fawdry.

Cradle Mountain. Picture: Brittany Atkins.

Devils Gullet. Picture: Simone Lockwood.

Devils Gullet. Picture: Simone Lockwood.

Devils Gullet. Picture: Simone Lockwood.

Devils Gullet. Picture: Simone Lockwood.

Icicles on the way to Highland Lakes Road, Deloraine side of the Great Lakes. Picture: Adrian Wigg

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Coastal TSL derby: pictures, photos

Posted on 24/04/2020 by

Coastal TSL derby: pictures, photos Devonport’s Braden Van Buuren.
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Devonport’s Scott Jaffray dodges Burnie’s 40, with a shepheard from team mate Braden Van Buuren (back).

Devonport’s Sam Hess and Burnie’s Jason Laycock keep their eyes on the ball in the ruck.

Devonport’s Toby Enniss and Burnie’s Harry Walters.

The tattered wind sock at West Park Oval does its best to show the wind direction after taking a bashing in the weather over the past week.

Three-quarter time score.

Patrons enjoy a run around out on the ground at three-quarter time.

Devonport’s Luc Keep and Burnie’s Kade Munday.

Devonport’s Luc Keep and Burnie’s Kade Munday.

Devonport’s Alexander Lee.

Burnie’s Nick McKenna and Devonport’s Ashley O’Donnell struggle to gain posession of the loose ball after a fumbled mark.

Burnie coach Andrew Hering (centre) and his staff keep an eye on the game.

Devonport coach Max “The Fox” Brown yells out instructions to his players.

Devonport’s Jordan Smith.

Full-time score.

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HUNTER HERO: Helen Cummings, advocate against domestic violence

Posted on 24/04/2020 by

RECOGNITION: Newcastle Women of the Year 2014, Helen Cummings, is also a domestic assault survivor and tireless campaigner. HELEN Cummings doesn’t consider herself strong or brave.
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But the 2014 Woman of the Year, domestic assault survivor and author of memoir Blood Vows has been an important advocate against violence towards women over the decades.

Ms Cummings was married at 20, but after six years of physical, psychological and emotional abuse from her husband, enough was enough.

Ms Cummings packed up her children’s lives and moved away from her husband Stuart Wynter, a respected doctor.

‘‘I didn’t even think about what having strength [was] or whether I was brave, I just ran out of choices,’’ she said.

‘‘I could no longer think of a happy life with this person. I figured he had the capacity to kill us and there wasn’t anything I could do to prevent that. I couldn’t be a better wife, I couldn’t help him and I couldn’t love him better.’’

Eight years later, Wynter killed his new wife and child before ending his own life.

Ms Cummings went on to work for the Family Law Courts for 20years, earned her associate law degree and spent 10years as an associate to a federal judge.

The 61-year-old grandmother finally sat down after she retired and penned her memoir, Blood Vows, which detailed the terrifying six years she spent fearing for her life at the hands of her abusive husband.

Ms Cummings said there was no support for her in her 20s as a domestic assault victim.

‘‘Not even the ability to talk about it to anybody, to tell anybody, because it didn’t have a label on it then,’’ she said.

‘‘I didn’t at any stage think I was a victim of domestic violence, or suffering, because I blamed myself. I thought something I was doing was making him behave in the way that he was.’’

Ms Cummings said she was glad that awareness about the dangers of domestic violence had spread over the decades since her ordeal but recognised the problem was still rampant.

‘‘That’s one of the things I try to highlight in my story, especially to younger people – we all try and put on the best front when we meet someone and fall in love but truthfully, it’s better that we ask that question to that person whom we are thinking about having a relationship with, ‘What is the worst thing you’ve ever done?’’’ she said.

‘‘Not everyone is born violent or with a deep-seated hatred or anger towards women, but when domestic violence is ongoing and systematic, it’s long-term demolition of you as a person over many years.’’

Ms Cummings has worked closely with VOCAL (Victims of Crime Assistance League), providing advocacy and support for victims of crime and their families.

She was awarded the 2014 Woman of the Year in front of a crowd of 400 people at the annual International Women’s Day breakfast at West Leagues Club.

Newcastle MP Tim Owen presented the award to Ms Cummings, describing her as an ‘‘outstanding example of selfless commitment to advocating for sustainable change in the community’’.

‘‘Helen, I would like to thank you on behalf of the hundreds of people you assisted, throughout your time at VOCAL in Hamilton, an amazing and invaluable organisation providing information, support, practical guidance, advocacy, and referrals for victims of crime, their friends, family, and the wider community,’’ Mr Owen said.

Ms Cummings says her advice to women living with domestic violence is ‘‘leave’’.

‘‘If you’re living with serious domestic violence that has been ongoing, that affects you, that isolates you, if you are living in fear, get help. Talk to somebody. Then leave,’’ she said.

‘‘Tell your family, tell your best friends, tell the males in your life that you trust. If you are in fear of your life, please go, please leave.’’

If you are living with domestic assault, call VOCAL on 49262711 or Lifeline after hours on 131114.

NSW Waratahs triumphantPhotos, Video

Posted on 24/04/2020 by

NSW Waratahs triumphant | Photos, Video Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport
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Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Metcalfe, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo: Joosep Martinson, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Joosep Martinson, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Metcalfe, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt king, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Joosep Martinson, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Mark Nolan, Getty Images Sport

Champions: Waratahs players celebrate after winning the Super Rugby final over the Crusaders at ANZ Stadium. Photo Matt King, Getty Images Sport

TweetFacebookWaratahs 32 (Ashley Cooper 2 tries, Foley conversion, Foley 7 penalty goals) defeated Crusaders 32 (Todd, Nadolo tries, Carter, Slade conversions, Slade 6 penalty goals).

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