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Blues close out Saints, Magpies keep finals hopes aliveHFNL wrap, photos

Posted on 29/06/2018 by

Blues close out Saints, Magpies keep finals hopes alive | HFNL wrap, photos HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.
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HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Warrnambool vs Koroit.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

HFNL: Port Fairy vs Camperdown.

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Congratulations Edwina Bone – Orange’s Commonwealth Games gold medallist – Gallery

Posted on 29/06/2018 by

Congratulations Edwina Bone – Orange’s Commonwealth Games gold medallist – Gallery GOLDEN TASTE: The Hockeyroos with their Commonwealth games gold medals. Photo: GETTY IMAGES
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TIGHT TEAM: Ashleigh Nelson gives Edwina a hug after Sunday’s win. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

MAKING A SPLASH: Edwina gets a pass away during the gold medal game. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

GROUP EFFORT: The Hockeyroos come together after Sunday’s dramatic gold medal game. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

PROUD PODIUM: The Hockeyroos celebrate their gold medals. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

IN THE NICK OF TIME: The Hockeyroos celebrate Jodie Kenny’s equaliser. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

MOMENT OF TRUTH: Edwina (second from right) and the Hockeyroos hold their breath during Sunday’s penalties shoot out. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

THE ROUGH STUFF: Edwina tangles with a Welsh opponent during a pool game. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

GOLDEN DELIGHT: The Hockeyroos celebrate their dramatic gold medal-winning performance. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

SETTING THE SCENE: Australia plays England in the 2014 Commonwealth Games gold medal match. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

UNDER PRESSURE: Edwina comes under fire from a Welsh opponent earlier in the tournament. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

PROUD PODIUM: The Hockeyroos celebrate their gold medals. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

GOLDEN MOMENT: The Hockeyroos celebrate victory in penalties and Commonwealth Games gold. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

IT’S ALL OURS: The Hockeyroos celebrate after Sunday morning’s dramatic penalties win hands them the gold medal. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

IT’S ALL OURS: The Hockeyroos celebrate after Sunday morning’s dramatic penalties win hands them the gold medal. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

ROYAL SNAP: Edwina ducks out from behind the pack to grab a photo of the Queen. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

MARCHING WITH PRIDE: The Hockeyroos walk out to collect their medals after winning the women’s gold medal match. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

TIGHT TEAM: Ashleigh Nelson gives Edwina a hug after Sunday’s win. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

ALL OVER: England celebrates their goal in the Commonwealth Games final. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

TweetFacebookDown 1-0 with 24 seconds left on the clock, Australia were awarded a penalty corner, presenting one last attacking chance.

Anna Flanagan took the corner flick, only for it to be blocked, but then Kenny threaded the needle to score and send teammates into raptures and change the complexion of the match.

It’s Australia’s fourth Commonwealth victory from the five times hockey has been contested at the Games.

The Hockeyroos have proven the masters of the pressure situation, after also beating New Zealand on penalties to win the 2010 final in Delhi.

Casey Eastham was first to the spot in penalties and bamboozled England keeper Maddie Hinch back and forth before finally squeezing the ball in.

Next it was England’s Georgie Twigg who managed to swerve around Australian goalie Lynch to square it up.

Our triumphant @Hockeyroos step onto the top step of the podium at #[email protected]老域名/Wlq5PWKDMi

— Hockeyroos (@Hockeyroos) August 2, 2014Coach Adam Commens had been confident before the match that a goal feast was the on cards if his side could set an early foundation.

But as the rain tumbled the goals failed to come and, despite a weight of possession, the Hockeyroos couldn’t convert and world No.6 England made the most of it.

The previous day England beat New Zealand in the semi in an epic penalty shoot-out, and on Sunday they looked like they would be giant killers again.

After 48 minutes without a goal, it was the girls in red and white who broke the deadlock.

Susie Gilbert managed to get a pass into the middle of the circle, for Lily Owsley to skilfully dig it out of two of Australian sticks and smash home her shot.

But in the clutch moment, it was the Hockeyroos who came up gold.

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Pearce’s warning after 255-point win: Tigers can still improve – Gallery

Posted on 29/06/2018 by

Pearce’s warning after 255-point win: Tigers can still improve – Gallery KICKING ON: Orange Tigers’ Simon Kay looks long. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER
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HANDING ON: Orange Tigers’ Simon Kay accepts a teammate’s pass. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

PUNCHING ON: Orange Tigers’ Tim Barry moves the ball forward. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

EYES AHEAD: Orange Tigers’ Chris Rothnie tries to spy an open teammate. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

IN TRAFFIC: Orange Tigers’ Paul Jenkins gets this kick away just in time. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

HUNTED BY DEMONS: Orange Tigers’ Ben Monaghan is a man without a lot of time. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

GETTING UP THERE: Dubbo Demons’ Strauan Pearce competes for the ball. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

TIME ON HIS SIDE: Orange Tigers’ Paul Jenkins puts boot to ball. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

IN FRONT: Orange Tigers’ Paul Jenkins secures possession. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

HERE HE COMES: Orange Tigers’ Justin Fong chases down Dubbo Demons’ Dean Gauld on Saturday. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

IN THE NICK OF TIME: Orange Tigers’ Justin Fong just fails to chase down Dubbo Demons’ Dean Gauld. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

EMERGING FROM THE PACK: Orange Tigers’ Justin Fong leads the chase for the ball. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

AERIAL ASSAULT: Orange Tigers’ Justin Fong climbs high at the Country Club Oval. Photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

ON FOR YOUNG AND OLD: Orange Tigers and Dubbo Demons players compete for the ball at the Country Club Oval on Saturday. photo: LUKE SCHUYLER

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Gallery : Yeoval surge into the Grand Final

Posted on 29/06/2018 by

Gallery : Yeoval surge into the Grand Final Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.
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Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

Yeoval v Dubbo Rhinos major semi final highlights.

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Christians protest at treatment in the Middle East

Posted on 29/06/2018 by

Protesting the purging of Christians in Mosul: Demonstrators gather in the streets of Sydney. Photo: Brett Hemmings Christians mistreated in Middle East: Protesters rally at Martin Place. Photo: Brett Hemmings
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More than 5000 people took to the streets in Sydney on Saturday in a peaceful protest to raise awareness about the plight of Christians being persecuted and killed in the Middle East.

The protest brought together numerous denominations, including Assyrians, Chaldeans, Syriacs and Coptic Orthodox, wanting to expose the atrocities that are also being carried out against Christians, particularly in Iraq.

Demonstrators said members of their faith had been targeted and killed, some crucified and left to hang on crosses, while some of the oldest churches in the Middle East were being desecrated.

They said the entire population of Christians in Mosel had been purged.

In a message of support for the peaceful protest from the Coptic Orthodox Church, Bishop Anba Suriel said there had not been enough international support or protection for Christians.

“We are witnessing a heinous cleansing of the entire Christian population in the Middle East … the world’s silence is fuelling these extremist terrorist groups,” Bishop Suriel said.

Organisers said Christians in Australia were “dismayed and hurt that our media and politicians have failed to acknowledge these evil acts”.

“Our politicians have a duty to treat all persecuted peoples equally and impartially,” one said.

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GPS rugby safe, parents insist, but scholarships raise qualms

Posted on 29/06/2018 by

Weighing in on athletic bursaries: Parents watch as Saint Ignatius’ College, Riverview, plays Scots College. Photo: Cole BennettsA cross section of GPS parents and supporters have largely rejected public concerns about student safety in GPS rugby, despite last weekend’s 101-0 defeat of Newington at the hands of Scots College.
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However at least some parents expressed criticisms about the scholarship structure, and its impact on student safety, when approached at Scots’ top-of-the-table clash with Riverview in Lane Cove on the weekend, which Scots won 31-21 after coming back from 0-21 at half-time.

Riverview parent Guy Thompson said the increasing use of athletic bursaries was undermining the development role of sport in schools.

“It sort of undermines the whole school if you import kids who are already good,” Mr Thompson said. “That just says they’re not into developing kids.

“There’s a whole bunch of welfare options available that we can [use] to educate people that are otherwise not going to get it.

“It’s a waste of time, and it’s dangerous.”

Mr Thompson said mismatched teams “absolutely” posed a safety risk to players.

“It’s an absolute waste of time, no side learns from it, and it’s dangerous,” he said.

After the Newington thrashing, Rugby great Nick Farr-Jones called for a drastic change to the competition, including a restriction on the number of athletes on lucrative sporting scholarships fielded by each team.

“I don’t like mismatches,” he said. “I don’t think it builds character. I don’t think it is good for anyone. My major concern is safety. If there are significant weight and strength differences [between teams] then there are safety issues and we have to be careful of that.”

During the week Scots College principal Dr Ian Lambert rejected Mr Farr-Jones’ comments in an email to the school community, saying that  he would not allow “shallow and misguided criticisms … without rebuttal”.

Dr Lambert denied the school was stacking the team with players on sports scholarships, saying: ‘‘Scots is not professionalising schoolboy sport. We unashamedly aim for excellence in sport in the same way we aim for excellence in music, mathematics or any other subject.”

Sally Clinton, the mother of a Riverview player, said she was “always worried” at the possibility of her son being injured during matches.

But she dismissed the claim that the competition had become more dangerous due to teams importing players on athletic scholarships, and said they helped “kids who would otherwise never have the opportunity”.

“If they bring them in at a young age then that’s fine. It’s when they bring them in right at the end, and the boys that have worked their way up get dropped. I think that’s been happening in the past, definitely, but it’s stopped now,” Mrs Clinton said.

Others dismissed concerns about the imbalance in the competition, pointing to similar results in the past.

“We were very good on the day,” said John White, a Scots College ‘Old Boy’, referring to last week’s resounding victory.

“It just happens,” another Scots supporter said, adding that “ ‘Joey’s’ were beating everybody by 90- to 100-0 a few years ago.”

That such scorelines are a natural part of the sporting cycle was also echoed by Riverview parents.

“I think everybody recognises Scots are playing really well,” Mrs Clinton said.

“My boys just think that Scots are just a really good team. They see it as a challenge.”

Alini Hayson, whose son plays for Riverview’s first side, said the perception that the competition is mismatched is ill-informed.

“It’s actually not mismatched,” Mrs Hayson said, pointing out Riverview were fielding a side with more NSW representative players than Scots in Satuday’s top of the table clash.

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Deakin University dumps disgraced Liberal Aaron Lane

Posted on 29/06/2018 by

Former Liberal candidate Aaron Lane, disowned by his party after homophobic comments on Twitter, has now lost his work at Deakin University.
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University spokeswoman Sarah Dolan said Mr Lane had been a casual sessional tutor in law at the university teaching sessions in the first semester of this year.

”The situation is that he has previously worked in a casual role but he won’t be employed at Deakin any longer,” she said.

She would not elaborate on the matter and any reference on Deakin’s website to Mr Lane’s role at the university, if it ever existed, has been deleted.

Mr Lane, the Liberal Party’s candidate for the upper house Western Victoria Region, quit on Friday ahead of a party meeting at which it was expected he would be sacked.

A former Young Liberal president and fellow at the Institute of Public Affairs, he had posted a series of offensive comments on Twitter more than two years ago, which surfaced on Friday morning.

Mr Lane, who has been a party member for more than a decade, used the derogatory term “faggots’’ and also said, “The problem is (IMO) many homos make their sexuality a defining aspect of their being’’.

He also referred to former Labor leader Simon Crean and former speaker Peter Slipper as “a giant C’’.

Another tweet said “shirts are for faggots’’.

Mr Lane said he was not a homophobic person and he regretted using juvenile language. He apologised for the comments, which he said were made more than two years ago. He said the comments were embarrassing but that some of them were “stripped of all context”.

“I am sure everyone has said things that, on reflection, we wish we had not said, regardless of the context.

“I don’t want this hanging around the neck of the government; I’m a true believer in the Liberal cause.”

He said the comments about sexuality being a defining aspect was part of a conversation with an acquaintance from the university, Jarryd Bartle, who was head of the queer collective at Deakin.

Mr Bartle has confirmed that comment was taken out of context and that Mr Lane was agreeing with him about the idea of people identifying solely as a gay person was limiting.

Following the news of the comments, Premier Denis Napthine called on Mr Lane to stand down, saying there was no place for such comments.

“There is no place in my team or in the Coalition team for this sort of behaviour and these sorts of comments,’’ he said. “There’s no place in my team for homophobic comments.’’

Liberal Party state director Damien Mantach said the party had accepted the resignation and acknowledged that the comments made by Mr Lane were hurtful to many people and were entirely unacceptable.

“While Mr Lane has unreservedly apologised for his comments, the party believes it is important to send a strong message to the community that this behaviour will not be tolerated,” he said.

Revelations about Mr Lane follow earlier controversy this week when it was reported that  Dr Napthine instructed pro-life Liberal MP Bernie Finn to remove pictures of dead babies from his Facebook page.

And last month, Fairfax Media reported the Attorney-General Robert Clark would speak at the World Congress of Families, whose managing director Larry Jacobs is a strong supporter of Russian laws banning gay pride demonstrations and “homosexual propaganda”.

The same conference also features a speaker who links abortion to breast cancer.

Mr Lane is not the first candidate to stand down ahead of the election. In June, Labor’s candidate for the key marginal seat of Frankston Helen Constas stood aside over workplace bullying claims.

Mr Lane’s comments angered people on all sides of politics. Liberal MP for Prahran Clem Newton-Brown said there was no room for homophobic comments in Victorian politics.

Labor’s spokesman on equality Martin Foley said it was clear the Liberal Party was still home to offensive views, citing Mr Clark’s attendance at “an extreme conference”.

“Sacking Aaron Lane is not enough, Denis Napthine must stand up to the rest of the Liberal Party’s ‘hate faction’ and sack them, too,” Mr Foley said.

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We didn’t burn the Australian film industry

Posted on 29/06/2018 by

Many people blame piracy for the overall decline in the music market.I do not think that there is any advertisement that leaves me as unmoved as the one shown regularly in cinemas accusing people who watch pirate movies of burning up the Australian film industry. It is simply not very convincing, particularly in its apparent assumption that the consumer of a pirate movie (costing, say, $1 in Bali) might otherwise have paid $29.99 for it in some store in Sydney.
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Likewise with pirate music, pirate software and perhaps pirate watches, clothing and Lego. It is taken for granted in the copyright industry that a sale in the pirate sector, with the money passing to some small entrepreneur, or perhaps to the Mafia, is at the cost of a sale to the “legitimate” industry that is responsible for the conception, origin and development of the intellectual property concerned. But a good many things that are attractive to buyers at some greatly discounted cost would not be at all attractive at the price the legitimate seller demands and, if pirate goods were not available, there would be simply no transaction at all. There’s sometimes a hanging suggestion by those spruiking for copyright that innocent buyers are spending their money thinking they are buying the real thing, but my guess is that most purchasers know perfectly well that the $10 Rolex is not the real thing, that Chanel No.5 has not been discounted to a seller at the Aranda Markets, and that the revenue from the very cheap CD is not going to the already very rich musician to whose creative genius we owe it.

That does not necessarily make participating in such rip-offs OK, of course. Nor is it any more or less OK if one notes that the overwhelming proportion of all copyright and intellectual property rights are going to large transnational corporations, rather than starving or otherwise starving artists. The moral blameworthiness of stealing from Woolworths is no less than stealing from a little old lady.

That said, copyright and other rights in intellectual property are strange and evolving beasts, and one should not always respond to the greed of those who claim such rights, and want them ever extended at public expense. In normal circumstances, a dubious transaction with intellectual property should be at best a civil matter for misuse of property, not of theft, since the physical thing that the “owner” has is not usually touched. In any event, it does not seem to me that those who claim such property rights ought to have the capacity to unilaterally extend their rights, or that they should have state support for their power unless there is some sort of quid pro quo.

We used once, for example, to give patents to people who invented new things. This gave them an exclusive right to produce and sell the thing for a defined period. The public price of that right was that they had to disclose the idea, or the process for accomplishing it, so that when that exclusive period ended, others could enter into the marketplace – the free competition then, it was to be hoped, causing prices to fall. But the idea of the need for such a law occurred centuries ago, and the principles of how long an exclusive right ought to exist were devised long before modern capitalism, modern marketing, modern communications and technology.

It is by no means apparent that the period of a patent, or some other intellectual property right, ought to be the same as in 1600, or the same for a piece of computer software, or a life-saving drug, than for a stump-jump plough or a weaving machine. Generally, however, the rights of the owners of intellectual property have increased, not decreased, over time and so have the political power of the owners, most of which are now public corporations. The case that the having of such rights increases the amount of inventiveness, creative genius or the incentive to develop new products is poor at best. The greater proportion of drug companies, for example, spend far more on advertising than on research for new products, and a substantial proportion of seriously novel invention, idea or expression does not emerge from the capitalist incentive model.

Just as irritating is the fact that the most vociferous demanders of copyright protection are to be found in the United States, a nation whose massive expansion during the late 19th century was based on flagrant and unrewarded piracy of the intellectual property of nations of the Old World. At that stage of US economic development, the US had no patience at all for the rights of others. Once the US economy reached a critical mass, not least with the spur given by manufacturing for war, it became itself a great producer of ideas and inventions, and sharply changed its tune. A good deal of US diplomatic and trade activity consists of strong-arming agreeable old mates and sycophants, such as Australia, into adopting the ever-expanding claims of US intellectual property law or in threatening trade wars against countries, such as China (and once South Korea and Japan), they accuse of ripping the US off. Australia has no particular reason, in its own interest, to adopt American ideas about the need to reward genius, since we send much, much more money abroad for the right to rent the intellectual property of others than ever comes back for the rental of ours.

Ordinary consumers could be expected, quite reasonably, to be a good deal less punctilious about the possibility that someone’s intellectual property was involved if they thought of the owner as some vast corporation with an active army of lawyers, lobbyists and compliant politicians doing their bidding. It is much better to pretend that the “battle” is about protecting the rights of starving artists in garrets, or local and culturally appropriate content. This is so tiny a fraction of the intellectual property industry that we could probably pay every person claiming to be in a creative industry $100,000 a year, abolish all intellectual property laws and still be in front.

One also, sometimes, is given the impression by some copyright claimants that one has not engaged in a property transaction with them. It may be, for example, that I cannot permit the public broadcast or theatrical showing of a DVD I have purchased. But I am perfectly free to lend it to my best friends, or 1000, provided that each is a casual transaction, 1000 in a row, in just the same manner that I can lend my books or my garden shovel to anyone I like. Likewise, I can sell the copy I have to another person, although I cannot, of course, license a use other than the one that has been permitted to me. Some people seem to think that buying a second-hand record or DVD is piracy. It is not, but one cannot rely on self-serving but apparently disinterested public notices and warnings to tell you.

Fifty years ago, for example, there were many more musical works, mostly then records or tapes, sold than today in modern forms. In those days, there was no such thing as Australian performing rights for music, and popular songs were frequently played on radio without the artists concerned, or their transnational record companies, getting a penny for the airplay. But most artists were happy for the airplay because it appeared that the more one’s output was played, the more likely one was to sell more records or tapes. That did not prevent artists collectivising, then demanding copyright payments from those such as radio stations but also restaurants and building sites, demanding money for “performing rights” – even when only a small and domestic supply of performers was divvying up the lot, including the efforts of overseas performers. These days many people in this industry blame internet or other piracy for the considerable decline in the total size of the music market, but a good many people say that the real problem is that the present output is not as popular, and much of it struggles much harder to find a market.

Likewise, the fortunes of cinemas have waxed and waned over the years, including the years of the development of television, the invention of the videotape and the DVD and, more recently, pay television and the capacity of punters to source movies or programs, legitimately or otherwise, from the internet. Cinemas have, of course, adapted in their own ways to such changes in the marketplace, including with the development of smaller and more intimate theatres in large complexes. Moreover, the number of movies made in Australia has, over the years, depended rather more on the tax treatment of film-making than it has on theatre patronage per se.

I myself am too technically stupid to be a consumer of the sort of piracy of which the industry now complains so loudly. But one does not need to know what an iPod is, or what it does, to recognise specious arguments, however much subject to copyright.

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GALLERY: NRL Legend serves it up to the’Destroyers’

Posted on 29/06/2018 by

GALLERY: NRL Legend serves it up to the ‘Destroyers’ NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones
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NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

NRL Legend Nathan Hindmarsh visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to promote healthy eating with the ‘Finish with the Right Stuff’ campaign. Photo: Geoff Jones

TweetFacebook Hindy serves it up to the Quakers Hill Destroyers Pictures; Geoff JonesFormer Parramatta Eels captain and NRL legend visited the Quakers Hills Destroyers to teach the young players about eating healthy.

The Finish with the Right Stuff program is part of the NSW Government’s comprehensive five year Healthy Eating Active Living Strategy – aimed at reducing overweight and obesity and improving the general health and well-being of the NSW population.

NathanHindmarshknows first-hand that champions don’t run on junk.

“As an athlete I was given the best advice on how to keep my body healthy through diet and training,” he said.

“The Finish with the Right Stuff program helps our local sporting communities to educate their players, coaches and parents to make the right food and drink choices for kids when they’re in the sporting environment.

“As a dad of three very active young boys I know it is never too early to start developing healthy habits with children, whatever the level of sport or activity they are involved in.”

Dr Jo Mitchell, NSW Health’s Centre for Population Health Director said good habits are likely to continue through life when set up early.

“Healthy habits start early. Children need the right fuel to stay healthy and perform their best. After the game is over, all their hard work can be undone by eating unhealthy food and drinking soft drinks.”

Yeoval storm into Graincorp Cup Grand Final

Posted on 29/06/2018 by

Yeoval is the first team through to the Graincorp Rugby Union grand final scoring an epic win over Dubbo Rhinos Gold 29-24 at Apex Oval.
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The home side showed great courage in the second half but an incredible defensive performance laid the platform for a Yeovalgrand final for the small town heroes with big hearts.

Their captain Nic Job impressed with his team’s fighting spirit.

‘’A great effort, they played right to the end’’ he said ‘’ We gave away a few silly penalties but in the end an amazing defensive effort won us the game’’

The Eagles scored first after a few minutes Isaac Kinscher running almost the full length of the field with help from James Amey to score.

A Kane Rich penalty got Dubbo on the board but when they had football Yeoval used it well after they rolled the play toward the Rhino’s territory centre Trent McGovern stood well in the backs to dart around players to score.

The Rhinos did surge back Nick Rathbone going over under the posts and Rich’s conversion sailed over easily. Yeoval grabbed a penalty before the break and led 15-10 at half time.

After the spell Yeoval came out firing the same way they did at match start and Joshua Lees was over and at 22-10 The Rhinos had to come back with something.

They did. Dubbo began to rampage but at least five times Yeoval stopped them from scoring in a staggering display of bravery and when a player was sin binned they didn’t stop defending.

It took Villiam Turaga to blitzkrieg down the right side, exploding off a strong forward burst and Kane Rich landed a conversion from a difficult angle to make it 22-17 Yeoval holding on.

Jarred Willoughby scored not long after and the Rhinos with 5 minutes to go hit the front after Kane Rich converted.

Yeoval needed football and they pounced when in possession and began driving toward the try line and with 3 minutes left replacement Toby Key scored the match winner near the post on the left hand side and Amey’s conversion cemented their 29-24 lead which they held onto until the referee signalled the finish of a highly energy , exciting major semi final.

Yeoval’s boisterous and vocal supporters were in full voice, Yeoval players were arm in arm. The Eagles were into the grand final at home.

‘’We’re at home for the big one where we should be’’ Captain Nic Job said.

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